healthy house institute

4 Free HHI Books:

Creating a Healthy Household, The Healthy House Answer Book, Healthy Home Building, The Healthy House 4th Edition
Your email will only be used as described in our Privacy Policy

Follow us on Twitter

 

Search

Proud Supporter of:

OnlineCourses.com

 

OpenCourseWare

ArticleTechnical Article

Asthma Incidence Shows a 50 Percent Increase in Fat People

For overweight and obese individuals, the incidence of asthma increases by 50 percent, as compared to those of normal weight, according to a meta-analysis of seven studies on severe asthma involving 333,102 patients.

 

article continues below ↓


We do not strictly control Google ad content. If you believe any Google ad is inappropriate, please email us directly here.

The results appear in the first issue for April 2007 of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society.

E. Rand Sutherland, M.D., M.P.H., of the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, and one associate found a dose-dependent increase in the odds for asthma in overweight and obese men and women. Based on their results, the researchers suggest that asthma incidence could by reduced by targeted interventions against being overweight or obese.

According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2002), 65 percent of U.S. adults are either overweight or obese. “Although asthma is less prevalent than obesity, it affects approximately 7 percent of the adult population in the United States,” said Dr. Sutherland, who noted that the odds of asthma incidence in overweight men and women were similar.

Asthma, a respiratory disease characterized by recurrent episodes of difficult breathing, wheezing, cough and thick mucus production, affected approximately 20.5 million Americans in 2004. Some common asthma triggers are allergic stimuli, infections, stress or strenuous exercise.

“If significant weight loss could be achieved in the population of overweight and obese individuals, it could be estimated that the number of new asthma cases in United States adults might fall by as much as 250,000 per year,” said Dr. Sutherland. “If that decrease can be extrapolated to the pediatric population, where the annual incidence of asthma is as much as five times higher, the effect of even small changes in mean population body mass index may translate into significant decreases in asthma incidence in children and adults.”

The researchers noted that obesity in the absence of asthma causes physiologic impairments in lung function, including reduction in lung volume, chest wall restriction and an increase in the oxygen cost of breathing. It also contributes to various other conditions including gastroesophageal reflux and sleep apnea. These difficulties can result in breathlessness (dyspnea) and wheezing, which might be mistaken for asthma by patients and clinicians.

“Weight loss studies have shown improvements in lung function and asthma symptoms, but not necessarily in airflow obstruction or airway hyperresponsiveness,” said Dr. Sutherland. “It is also reasonable to believe that some of the patients with ‘asthma’ may have respiratory symptoms due to obesity but may not meet rigorous objective physiologic criteria for asthma.”

The authors concluded that obesity is a well-established risk factor for diabetes, sleep apnea, stroke, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and other illnesses. They said their findings support the addition of asthma to that list.

 

 

HHI Error Correction Policy

HHI is committed to accuracy of content and correcting information that is incomplete or inaccurate. With our broad scope of coverage of healthful indoor environments, and desire to rapidly publish info to benefit the community, mistakes are inevitable. HHI has established an error correction policy to welcome corrections or enhancements to our information. Please help us improve the quality of our content by contacting allen@healthyhouseinstitute.com with corrections or suggestions for improvement. Each contact will receive a respectful reply.

The Healthy House Institute (HHI), a for-profit educational LLC, provides the information on HealthyHouseInstitute.com as a free service to the public. The intent is to disseminate accurate, verified and science-based information on creating healthy home environments.

 

While an effort is made to ensure the quality of the content and credibility of sources listed on this site, HHI provides no warranty - expressed or implied - and assumes no legal liability for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, product or process disclosed on or in conjunction with the site. The views and opinions of the authors or originators expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of HHI: its principals, executives, Board members, advisors or affiliates.

Asthma Incidence Shows a 50 Percent Increase in Fat People:  Created on May 28th, 2007.  Last Modified on January 12th, 2010

 

We do not strictly control Google ad content. If you believe any Google ad is inappropriate, please email us directly here.

About American Thoracic Society

The American Thoracic Society, founded in 1905, is an independently incorporated, international, educational and scientific society which focuses on respiratory, critical care and sleep medicine. Today, the Society has approximately 18,000 members, 25 percent of whom are from outside the United States. The Society's members help prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care, and advocacy. The Society's long-range goal is to decrease morbidity and mortality from respiratory disorders and life-threatening acute illnesses.

 

 

Information provided by The Healthy House Institute is designed to support, not to replace the relationship between patient/physician or other qualified healthcare provider.

Education Partners

 

 

Popular Topics: Air Cleaners & Air Purifiers | Allergies & Asthma | Energy Efficiency & Energy Savings | Healthy Homes | Green Building
Green Cleaning | Green Homes | Green Living | Green Remodeling | Indoor Air Quality | Water Filters | Water Quality

© 2006-2017 The Healthy House Institute, LLC.

 

About The Healthy House Institute | Contact HHI | HHI News & Media | Linking Resources | Advertising Info | Privacy Policy | Legal Disclaimer

 

HHI Info