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The Healthy House Institute (HHI) Has Announced Boise-based Earthcraft Construction to Build New Headquarters-Home

June 26th 2013

 

The Healthy House Institute® (HHI) Education Center is pleased to announce it has engaged Boise-based Earthcraft Construction - http://www.earthcraftconstruction.com  - to build the new headquarters-home of the principals of the comprehensive educational resource and website that provides consumers information to make their homes healthier.
 
Mark L. Hixson, the founder and president of Earthcraft Construction, has more than 30 years’ experience in residential contracting and green building, pioneered straw bale homes in Boise, and Earthcraft’s recent USGBC LEED® project was Certified Gold. Earthcraft homes often include features such as:
 
•             Rainwater Harvesting for Irrigation
•             Drought-Tolerant & Indigenous Landscaping
•             Recycled Concrete (otherwise bound for the landfill) for Masonry & Retaining Walls
•             High Efficiency (95%) Furnace w/MERV 16 Filter 15-SEER Air Conditioning
•             Energy Star® Appliances and Lighting
•             Low VOC Finishes, Green-Label PLUS Carpet, FSC-Certified or Locally Harvested Lumber
•             Passive Solar
•             R32 Curtain Walls (Straw Bale)
•             R52 Roof Insulation
•             Solar Panels for Well Pump, Refrigerator & LED Lights
•             Solar Hot Water
•             "Permaculture" (Edible Landscaping)
 
“While HHI’s new headquarters-home will not include all of these features, it will be the greenest and healthiest structure we can afford to build, with the goal of modeling what can be done on a modest budget,” said Allen Rathey, president of HHI.
 
For more information about the build, please visit the project website at www.buildhealthy.com [to come].

 

 

 

HHI Recognizes the Generous Support of E.L. Foust Company In Assisting the Chemically Sensitive

June 2nd 2013

 

The Healthy House Institute® is pleased to recognize the generous assistance provided by E.L. Foust Company - http://www.foustco.com - in helping chemically-sensitive persons in locations including Boise, ID and Rio Rancho, NM.

“E.L. Foust, as a small but successful, enduring, and education-driven company, has been exceedingly generous in providing support to persons with chemical sensitivities including persons in the Boise metropolitan area,” said Allen Rathey, president of the Healthy House Institute (HHI).  “Though we do not endorse products, we do recommend that consumers consider companies that support education, and E.L. Foust is certainly one of them.”

According to Robert Marchand who facilitated a donation of an E.L. Foust 400 unit – a HEPA-filter-equipped model along with gas capture capabilities - in the Rio Rancho, NM area:  “The recipient of the donated unit was enormously grateful for the gesture from this niche provider of indoor environmental protection aids and equipment.  E.L. Foust is one of the relatively few companies that sensitive persons can trust for their indoor air quality and other home needs."

About E.L. Foust

Since 1974, Foust Air Purifiers - specifically manufactured for people with chemical sensitivities (CS), severe allergies, or asthma to remove chemicals, fumes, odors, and particles down to 0.1 microns from the air - have often been the units of choice of doctors and allergy sufferers. Great for use in the home, office, schools, or any place needing clean air, Foust air purifiers are all-metal construction, use no adhesives, contain large beds of carbon, and have HEPA filters without glue to avoid triggering sensitivities. Call 800-353-6878.

 

 

WQA Aquatech USA Reflects ‘Growing Vibrancy’ of Industry, Economy

April 23rd 2013

 

A high level of reported satisfaction at WQA Aquatech USA, which HHI attended, in early April reflects an industry growing with new technology and the promise of larger economic opportunity ahead, event organizers said.

“The buzz on the floor spoke of a growing vibrancy in our industry and hope surrounding the national economy,” said Dave Haataja, executive director of WQA. “With new networking events and the opportunity to experience coming technologies, those who took part left prepared to recharge their businesses back home."

WQA Aquatech USA 2013 was held in Indianapolis, Indiana, during the first week of April. According to a post-convention survey of attendees and exhibitors, more than 95 percent felt “satisfied” or “very satisfied."

“As a first-time attendee, I thought the show is a tour de force of water treatment and water quality info and technology,” said Allen P. Rathey, president of the Healthy House Institute, based in Idaho.  “I was fascinated and impressed by the resources - both technological and educational - offered to protect and improve the public water supply."

Exhibitors shared in surveys that they were consistently busy 85% of the time. They ranked the quality of attendees - such as whether they were decision makers and mission-focused - very high.

“As people begin to sense a thaw in the economy, we heard a lot of talk about lead generation and excitement about new technology,” said Haataja. “We also designed this year’s offerings with the understanding that networking is particularly crucial at a time when new opportunities may be arising."

A new welcome event at the NCAA Hall of Champions was highly attended. Education and the opportunity to take exams for certification credit also continue to be popular. This year saw an increase of 12% in certification exams over 2012 and 35% from 2011.

During informative sessions throughout the convention, members were introduced to new materials and approaches, such as the WQA toolkit series, a number of pamphlets on the major public topics facing the industry. Guided tours at the Indianpolis Zoo and a brewery offered the opportunity to see treatment products at work.

The show also included a review on the progress of WQA’s strategic plan. The five-year plan, now in its second full year, seeks to implement major objectives, focused on regulatory and government affairs, sustainability, globalization, technology and market development, membership, and professional and product certification.

WQA task forces made progress on issues such as product and professional certification, new standards, and government affairs.

For those unable to attend, recordings of many sessions may be ordered at softconference.com. The full set of recordings includes a wide range of technical topics and an overview of major issues facing the industry.

The Water Quality Association is a not-for-profit international trade organization representing the residential, commercial, and industrial water treatment industry. Its membership consists of both manufacturers/suppliers as well as dealers/distributors of equipment and services. WQA is a resource and information source, a voice for the industry, an educator of professionals, a laboratory for product testing, and a communicator to the public.

Contact: Dave Loveday    
Water Quality Association    
International Headquarters & Laboratory    
4151 Naperville Road, Lisle, Illinois 60532-3696 USA    
Email:    DLoveday@wqa.org    
Phone:    630 505 0160    
Fax:    630 505 9637

 

 

 

NSF International and the Healthy House Institute Partner to Educate Consumers on Home Health and Safety

April 12th 2013

 

NSF International and the Healthy House Institute (HHI) are partnering to help educate consumers on a variety of home health and safety topics.  NSF, a public health and safety organization, will provide content for the HHI website on food safety, hand washing, nutritional supplements, green living, and proper cleaning and maintenance of home appliance products.

NSF International is a global organization that writes product standards, and tests and certifies products for the food, water, nutritional supplements and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment.  As part of its mission, NSF International helps educate consumers on important human health topics, and HHI is committed to helping consumers make their homes healthier.

“We believe this partnership between NSF International and the Healthy House Institute will help consumers worldwide live healthier, initially by teaching them about how to improve their health and safety behavior in the home,” said Allen Rathey, Healthy House Institute President.  “Consumers have become much more safety minded.  Not only are they concerned about home safety, but they also seek out products that have been tested and certified against safety and quality standards by an independent organization.  NSF International is the perfect partner to provide content for HHI, as they provide public health and safety services and test and certify a wide range of products, including nutritional supplements and home appliances.”

While NSF International will initially provide web content regarding safe food handling and preparation in the home, future topics will focus on proper hand washing, green living, nutritional supplement safety and proper cleaning and maintenance of home appliances.

“We look forward to working with the Healthy House Institute to help further educate consumers about how they can protect their family’s health,” said Robert Donofrio, Ph.D., Director of NSF International’s Applied Research Center, which conducts primary research to advance public health in water safety, food safety, as well as healthcare and consumer products.  Dr. Donofrio, who also serves on the Healthy House Institute’s Advisory Board, added “Together, we can provide consumers with the information they need to make educated decisions about the products they purchase for better health.”

A recent independent survey conducted on behalf of NSF International indicated that consumers are concerned about the safety of their food, nutritional supplements and over-the-counter (OTC) medications as well as the overall quality and safety of products used in the home, including kitchen appliances.  In fact, more than half of the respondents indicated concerns about the quality and safety of kitchen appliances, cookware materials and their coatings.  Additionally, respondents who take dietary supplements daily (60 percent) tend to be more concerned about OTC medications than the general public (59 percent vs. 55 percent).  This may be why 73 percent of those surveyed said they look for independent certification marks or seals of approval on products when shopping.

Through the partnership, NSF also hopes to educate more consumers about the importance of choosing certified home products.  NSF has a 70-year history in certifying commercial foodservice equipment and last year began to apply this experience by developing a similar program focused on products used in the home.  The NSF Home Product Certification (HPC) program builds on, but is separate from NSF’s commercial food equipment program, by helping to ensure the safety, performance and quality of home consumer products and appliances such as cookware, blenders and coffee makers. These products are tested to confirm that they meet criteria such as quality, performance, food contact and cleanability.  The last factor is particularly important for preventing foodborne illness.

“Germs often gather in places we don't think about cleaning, which is why NSF's Home Product Certification program tests the cleanability of the products that bear the NSF Certified for Home Use mark, in addition to testing performance and durability,” said Lisa Yakas, a microbiologist who is Senior Project Manager for NSF’s Consumer Products Division. “When consumers purchase kitchen appliances certified by NSF, they’ll know that NSF also has verified the manufacturer’s cleaning directions, hence following these directions will help prevent the harboring of germs that can cause foodborne illnesses."

Through the NSF Applied Research Center, Yakas and Dr. Donofrio conduct an annual study on household germs and the most recent study focused on kitchen products. To help educate consumers about proper cleaning of these appliances, NSF recently released a list of the top six places in which foodborne illness-causing germs can hide when kitchen tools and appliances are not properly cleaned.  These items included:

  • Refrigerator vegetable compartment: Salmonella, Listeria, yeast and mold
  • Refrigerator meat compartment: Salmonella, E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Blender gasket: Salmonella, E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Can opener: Salmonella, E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Rubber spatula: Salmonella, E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Food storage container with rubber seal: Salmonella, yeast and mold

For more information about the partnership between NSF International and the Healthy House Institute, or to schedule an interview with an NSF home safety expert, contact Greta Houlahan at 734-913-5723 or houlahan@nsf.org.

Consumer product manufacturers interested in learning more about NSF’s consumer products and private label services can contact NSF at homeproducts@nsf.org, 877-520-5224 or visit nsfhomeproducts.org.

About NSF International

NSF International (www.nsf.org) has been testing and certifying products for safety, health and the environment for nearly 70 years. As an independent public health and safety organization, NSF is committed to protecting and improving human health on a global scale. NSF protects families by testing and certifying thousands of consumer goods each year, including kitchen products and appliances, personal care products, dietary and sport supplements, bottled water, pool and spa equipment, water treatment systems, plumbing fixtures and many other products used in homes every day. Look for the NSF mark on these products.

NSF International’s Applied Research Center (ARC) provides original research and custom R&D services for the water, food, pharma, consumer products and sustainability industries. ARC establishes strategic partnerships with academia, industry and regulatory bodies for research and development projects geared to furthering public health. ARC’s team of scientists, technical experts and public health professionals perform confidential research and development analyses in chemistry, microbiology and toxicology and test and validate manufacturer and environmental claims to efficiently and economically improve product marketability.

 

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI ) Thanks Maid Brigade for Educational Support

January 12th 2013

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI ) is pleased to thank Maid Brigade for its early and long-term support of HHI educational content.

"Maid Brigade was one of our earliest supporters when we launched the HHI site in 2007, and we wish to thank and recognize them," said Allen Rathey, president of HHI.  "The HHI enterprise was funded by sponsorships, rather than venture capital or borrowed money, and we wish to thank Maid Brigade for its critical and powerful support at the right time to enable us to maintain our editorial  integrity and independent content in the crowded information universe of the Internet."

While HHI does not endorse products or services, we believe in recognizing our supporters while seeking to maintain an elevated standard of credibility and striving for accuracy of facts about healthful homes and living.

We hope that if you are considering hiring a more healthful home cleaning service that you give Maid Brigade strong consideration as you perform your due diligence.

 

 

IICRC to Be Featured on “Designing Spaces™” Airing on Lifetime Television “Creating a Healthier Living Environment” segment highlights Certified Firms

January 2nd 2013

 

The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) announces it will be featured on the show “Designing Spaces” airing on Lifetime. The segment “Creating a Healthier Living Environment” will air on Jan. 4 and Jan. 31 at 7:30 a.m. ET/PT. The segment highlights the importance of choosing a professional, IICRC Certified Firm.

The IICRC partnered with “Designing Spaces™” to showcase to U.S. consumers how IICRC Certified Firms stand out from the competition. The show’s one million viewers provided an ideal opportunity for the IICRC to increase awareness and serve as a voice on behalf of the industry.

“Designing Spaces™” is the signature home improvement television series that travels all over the country redefining and redesigning space. The show provides real-life solutions to real-life problems for homeowners, representing a resource of learning and a trusted name in home remodeling, home decorating and home design that viewers know and respect.

“In this segment, the IICRC discusses professional carpet cleaning and its role in creating a healthier indoor environment,” said Hank Unck, chair of the IICRC Marketing and Communications Committee. “The show positions the IICRC as the leading resource for consumers looking to find reputable, professional and knowledgeable cleaning, inspection and restoration services.”

Rachel Adams, the president of Indoor Environmental Management, Inc., serves as the on-air spokesperson for the IICRC.  Word of Mouth Carpet Restoration, a Fort Lauderdale-based Certified Firm, represented the IICRC by demonstrating how a certified, professional firm cleans.

“Filming this segment helped me think about the IICRC from a different perspective, the consumer perspective,” said Adams. “Carpet cleaning technicians and companies are not all the same and it’s very important for a homeowner to know the difference in order to make an educated decision.”

Once the segment airs, it will be available for IICRC Certified Firms to download and use in their marketing materials.

“As a Certified Firm, we understand how important it is that consumers understand what it means to hire an IICRC certified professional,” said Eric Vander Wiede, owner of Word of Mouth Carpet Restoration. “This segment is one step the IICRC is taking to help promote our certifications.”

Tune into “Designing Spaces” on Jan. 4 and Jan. 31at 7:30 a.m. ET/PT.

About the IICRC

The IICRC is an international, ANSI-accredited standard-development organization (SDO) that certifies individuals in 20+ categories within the inspection, cleaning and restoration industries. Representing more than 54,000 certified technicians in 22 countries, the IICRC, in partnership with regional and international trade associations, represents the entire industry. The IICRC does not own schools, employ instructors, produce training materials, or promote specific product brands, cleaning methods or systems. To know if a technician has received proper education and training, consumers should look for the cleantrust patch and logo, the service mark of the IICRC. For more information, visit www.iicrc.org.

Maite Wodele | Edelman
121 S. Orange Ave. Suite 1500 | Orlando, FL 32801
407.377.6833 (o) 407. 307.94.24 (c )
Maite.Wodele@edelman.com

 

 

 

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) Supports 2013 NEHA Conference

October 28th 2012

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) has announced its support of the Denver, Colorado-based National Environmental Health Association-NEHA’s 2013 Annual Educational Conference (AEC) & Exhibition, July 9-11, 2013, in Washington, DC.  NEHA’s AEC is the most comprehensive annual training and education event for environmental health professionals, representing an opportunity for environmental health professionals to meet face-to-face with over 1,000 of their peers, and access products, services, information, and expertise to help them carry out their responsibilities more effectively in a changing world.

“We believe a variety of health related organizations and individuals should exhibit, attend, and participate at the NEHA AEC - the premier event for environmental health training, education, networking and advancement - and have made a commitment to share information about the event with our partner and media contacts,” said Allen P. Rathey, President, The Healthy House Institute.

“NEHA is pleased to have the support of the significant information resource represented by The Healthy House Institute for our Annual Educational Conference & Exhibition,” said Nelson Fabian, Executive Director and CEO, National Environmental Health Association. “We expect next year’s event to be the best ever, and anticipate a robust turnout.”

For more information, visit http://www.neha2013aec.org

About the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA)

 

The National Environmental Health Association is a professional society for environmental health practitioners. NEHA’s 4,500+ members practice their profession in the public and private sectors as well as in academia and the uniformed services, with a majority being employed by state and local county health departments.  NEHA’s Journal of Environmental Health has subscribers in over 40 countries around the world. Because it encompasses the entire environmental health profession, this single organization effectively serves as the forum for discussion of, and can address the broad spectrum of, environmental health issues.

 

 

HC, HHI, HFI Promote Charitable Giving Through Sears Product Reviews

June 14th 2012

 

The Housekeeping Channel (HC), The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and The Healthy Facilities Institute (HFI) have been approached by Sears to share with our readers an opportunity to help one or more of the charities described below by sharing reader reviews of products sold by Sears.

Sears is inviting consumers to give back to their favorite charity by participating in the retailer’s “Love/Hate: Share Your Thoughts, Send Some Love” project. Through June 28, 2012, customers have the opportunity to review a product in order to vote for one of the three charities below. The participating charities competing for the grand prize of $100,000 include the American Cancer Society, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and the World Wildlife Fund.

The Charities

American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society combines an unyielding passion with nearly a century of experience to save lives and create a world with less cancer. The American Cancer Society consists of a global grassroots force of more than 3 million volunteers.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital®

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital® opened 50 years ago and has changed the way the world treats childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. St. Jude speeds discoveries directly from its labs to patients, doctors and researchers everywhere. And no family ever pays St. Jude for anything.

World Wildlife Fund

WWF is the world’s leading conservation organization, working in 100 countries for half a century. With the support of 1.3 million members in the United States and 5 million members worldwide, WWF is dedicated to delivering science-based solutions to conserve nature and reduce the most pressing threats to the diversity of life on Earth.

“Customer opinions are important to us at Sears. Good or bad, we want to encourage the online community to share their thoughts on our products,” said Adriana Llames, division vice president, social media marketing for Sears. “The Love/Hate project will help us continue our commitment to providing products our customers love while helping to further the work of their favorite charities."

Sears customers can make a difference through the Love/Hate campaign by sharing their opinions on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/LoveHateCharity. Customers of all ages are invited to participate.* Every two weeks Sears will make a contribution to one of the three charities, with the final grand prize charity receiving a $100,000 contribution that will be announced on Sears Holdings’ SHOP YOUR WAY social commerce site at www.shopyourway.com.

Customers can find more information about the Love/Hate project and share their thoughts by visiting http://on.fb.me/LoveHateCharity. Additionally, they can follow the SHOP YOUR WAY Love.Hate Page on www.shopyourway.com  to get tidbits about the program along the way and find out who the Grand Prize winner is at http://bit.ly/LoveHate2012.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO REVIEW A PRODUCT OR TO VOTE. Only participating charities are eligible to receive donations. Voting participation to legal residents of the 50 U.S./D.C -  Must Be 18+. Subject to terms and conditions at http://on.fb.me/LoveHateCharity.

About Sears Holdings Corporation

Sears Holdings Corporation is a leading integrated retailer with over 3,900 full-line and specialty retail stores in the United States and Canada and the home of SHOP YOUR WAY, a social shopping experience where members have the ability to earn points and receive benefits across a wide variety of physical and digital formats through www.shopyourway.com. Sears Holdings is the leading home appliance retailer as well as a leader in tools, lawn and garden, fitness equipment and automotive repair and maintenance. Key proprietary brands include Kenmore, Craftsman and DieHard, with a broad apparel offering, including such well-known labels as Lands' End, the Kardashian Kollection, Jaclyn Smith and Joe Boxer, as well as Sofia by Sofia Vergara and The Country Living Home Collection. Sears is a leading provider of home services, with more than 11 million service calls made annually, and has a long-established commitment to those who serve in the military through initiatives like the Heroes at Home program. Sears has been named the 2011 Mobile Retailer of the Year, Recipient of the 2012 ENERGY STAR® "Corporate Commitment Award" for Product Retailing and Energy Management and is one of Top 20 Best Places to Work for Recent Grads. Sears Holdings Corporation operates through its subsidiaries, including Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Kmart Corporation. For more information, visit Sears Holdings' website at www.searsholdings.com. Twitter: @searsholdings | |Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SHCCareers.

Links: Website - http://www.searsholdings.com.

*For children under the age of 18, parental supervision is recommended.

 

# # #

 

Media Contact:

Tom Aiello

847-286-7387

Tom.Aiello@searshc.com

 

 

Advisory Board Member: Robyn Griggs Lawrence, Editor-in-chief of Organic Spa Magazine

February 11th 2012

 

Robyn Griggs Lawrence is the editor-in-chief of Organic Spa magazine, author of The Wabi-Sabi House, Simply Imperfect: Revisiting the Wabi-Sabi House and Seven Steps to a Safe, Nurturing Nursery, an e-book that she co-authored with Dr. Frank Lipman.

Lawrence, the editor-in-chief of Natural Home magazine from 1999 until 2010, writes and speaks on topics ranging from eco-building to healthy homes and has run successful blogs at the Huffington Post, Care2.com and Mother Earth News, where she served as editor-at-large. Her journalism career has included reporting and editing positions at The Chicago Tribune, Adweek and InformationWeek, and her books have received critical acclaim in Time magazine, the New York Times and the Boston Herald, among others. She has been a guest on CNN’s “Open House” and on TV and radio programs nationwide.

 

 

Advisory Board Member: Pauli Undesser, Director of Regulatory and Technical Affairs for the Non-profit Water Quality Association (WQA)

February 11th 2012

 

Pauli Undesser is the Director of Regulatory and Technical Affairs for the non-profit Water Quality Association (WQA).  She also maintains the title of Toxicology Manager for the WQA Gold Seal Product Certification Program and is the technical liaison for the Water Quality Research Foundation (WQRF). WQA is an international trade association of more than 2,500 member companies worldwide who manufacture and sell point-of-use (POU) and point-of-entry (POE) water treatment equipment. WQRF formed in 1949 to serve, on behalf of the Water Quality Association (WQA), as a universally recognized, independent research organization.
 
Pauli holds a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a master’s degree in Biochemistry from Northern Illinois University. After 11 years of applied laboratory work ranging from wet chemistry and organic chemistry to molecular biology and protein expression, her background in chemistry and biochemistry were applied at the Water Quality Association managing third party certification of drinking water treatment products and developing an internal toxicology program. Once those positions were well under her belt, Pauli transitioned into her current role as Director of Regulatory and Technical Affairs.
 
Pauli is a member of several professional societies including the Society of Toxicology, American Water Works Association, Water Environment Federation, International Code Council, and the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials.

 

 

LEEDing with Ventilation for Healthier Homes

October 26th 2011

 

Given the importance of fresh air to healthy indoor environments, the Healthy House Institute (HHI) and Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) are working together to call public attention to the home ventilation requirements of the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC’s) LEED for Homes Rating System. The collaboration, starting in Fall 2011, will include HVI articles published on the HHI website, joint press highlighting the LEED requirements for home ventilation, and other outreach including e-learning initiatives.

“Promoting fresh air indoors through better ventilation is a positive and necessary step to protect ourselves, our children, elderly and loved ones at home where we are most vulnerable,” states Allen Rathey, president of the Healthy House Institute (HHI), Boise ID. “The USGBC’s recommendations are especially commendable because they are sensible, allow flexibility in how proper ventilation is achieved, and balance today’s energy-saving economic concerns with environmental and climate factors."

“It is laudable that the USGBC’s LEED for Homes Rating System awards points toward LEED certification for installing whole-house ventilation systems, supply and exhaust fans, garage ventilation fans, and heat/energy recovery systems to ‘reduce occupant exposure to indoor pollutants by ventilating with outdoor air,’” says Jacki Donner, Executive Director of the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI).  “This goal is made all the more achievable with advances in home technology such as high efficiency fans, heat recovery ventilators (HRVs), and energy recovery ventilators (ERVs) that enable ventilating simply and cost-effectively."

The LEED for Homes rating system stipulates that builders and contractors meet the ventilation requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 and that overall systems meet third party performance testing standards.

HVI recommends that manufacturers have their equipment tested by independent labs and certified by HVI for performance in connection with airflow, sound level, and energy usage. HVI Certification is currently required for the US EPA’s ENERGY STAR® Program, Canadian Regulatory Agencies and compliance with various U.S. state requirements. The test procedures are developed by HVI based on national and international consensus determinations as well as standards of other agencies in accordance with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the Standards Council of Canada.

 “We see a strong synergy of objectives here,” added Rathey. “Every home needs ventilation to protect people from unhealthy indoor pollutants and the structure from excess moisture. These combined activities - those of the USGBC, HVI and HHI - help to promote the health and growth of the home ventilation industry while providing consumers with valuable information, confidence in their choices, and greener, healthier environments."

For a list of HVI-Certified Products, Manufacturers, and Brand Names, visit the HVI-Certified Products Directory.  HVI updates the HVI-Certified Products Directory monthly.

About HHI

The Healthy House Institute™ (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes, covering topics in-depth such as air and water quality, building, remodeling and furnishing, cleaning and housekeeping, health and safety, ventilation, lighting, energy efficiency and more.

The Institute’s goal is to reach a mainstream educated consumer with credible information merging the best of ‘green’ with the best of healthier homes research, indoor environmental data, health and medical science, into a practical, timely, easily digestible but comprehensive message. HHI strives to be a truly authoritative voice that has the ‘ear’ and trust of major media, influentials, and most importantly, the intelligent consumer. For more information, contact HHI at 13998 West Hartford Dr., Boise, ID 83713; Telephone: 208-938-3137; Fax: 208-938-3138. Visit the website at www.healthyhouseinstitute.com.

About HVI

The Home Ventilating Institute (HVI), founded in 1955, is a nonprofit association of the manufacturers of home ventilating products. Through a Certified Ratings Program, HVI provides a voluntary means for residential ventilation manufacturers to report comparable and creditable product performance information based upon uniformly applied testing standards and procedures performed by independent laboratories.

Today, HVI represents manufacturers from the United States, Canada, Asia and Europe, producing the majority of the residential ventilation products sold in North America. For more information, contact HVI at 1000 N. Rand Road, Suite 214, Wauconda, IL 60084. Telephone: 847-416-7257; Fax: 480-559-9722; E-mail: hvi@hvi.org. Visit the website at www.hvi.org.

 

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and Water Quality Association (WQA) Announce Partnership

October 26th 2011

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and the Water Quality Association (WQA) recently formed an educational partnership to help consumers understand the importance of and technology behind improving residential water quality.

“The partnership is a logical pairing as both organizations are devoted to arming consumers with information to make their homes healthier,” says Allen Rathey, president, HHI.

Under the terms of the agreement, HHI of Boise, Idaho, will develop articles showcasing the value of WQA certification programs and educating consumers on water quality issues for the HHI Web site. WQA of Lisle, Ill., will team with HHI to develop collaborative press releases designed to boost the public’s awareness of water quality issues and drive traffic to both organizations’ Web sites.

“We are excited about the potential of this partnership,” says Rathey. “The WQA/HHI educational program is a recipe that yields results over time once all the ingredients are present. The first ingredient is establishing regular content on HHI so search engines will find it, and the public and media will begin to learn about WQA and related products/benefits. Next, we will begin joint press releases disseminated by wire service. These press releases, written from a consumer perspective, will help drive media interest, producing more awareness and traffic to both sites.”

Pauli Undesser, WQA director of regulatory and technical affairs, agrees: “This partnership will aid WQA in further disseminating water quality information to the public. It’s a win-win for the WQA, the HHI, and the consumer. The more informed consumers are the better water quality choices they will make.”

About HHI

The Healthy House Institute® (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes, covering topics in-depth such as air and water quality, building, remodeling and furnishing, cleaning and housekeeping, health and safety, ventilation, lighting, energy efficiency and more.

The Institute’s goal is to reach a mainstream educated consumer with credible information merging the best of ‘green’ with the best of healthier homes research, indoor environmental data, health and medical science, into a practical, timely, easily digestible but comprehensive message. HHI strives to be a truly authoritative voice that has the ‘ear’ and trust of major media, influentials, and most importantly, the intelligent consumer.

About WQA

WQA is a not-for-profit association that provides public information about water treatment issues and also trains and certifies professionals to better serve consumers. WQA has more than 2,500 members internationally. WQA provides Gold Seal certification for products that remove a variety of contaminants. These products are tested according to independently developed standards of the highly respected ANSI (the American National Standards Institute).

 

 

HHI and AAFA are Helping Americans With Allergies and Asthma

September 9th 2011

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) are working together this fall to help disseminate health information to the 60 million Americans living with allergies or asthma.  The efforts will include collaboration to produce content for HHI’s website and outreach to teach consumers how to reduce allergens and irritants at home.

HHI has created a dedicated Asthma and Allergies section on its website, wherein AAFA will provide content.  In addition, AAFA-bylined articles will appear monthly on HHI’s home page. Other forms of outreach are also in development.

"From paints and finishes, to mattresses, to floorcare, to selection of household cleaners and other products, everyone can improve the indoor air quality in their homes by making small, informed changes,” said Allen Rathey, president of HHI. “AAFA’s well-vetted body of research and health expertise combined with HHI’s focus on the home as an integrated system will help us to better inform the public about practical steps they can take to prevent problems.”

“We are pleased to be able to work with HHI in a holistic approach to help improve the lives of families with asthma and allergies,” said Mike Tringale, M.S.M., AAFA’s Vice President of External Affairs. “We share HHI’s commitment to helping people improve their indoor environment and health by teaching them to reduce or eliminate triggers such as dust mites, pet dander, and VOCs."

About Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

A not-for-profit organization founded in 1953, AAFA is the leading national patient and consumer organization helping people with asthma, allergies and related diseases through education, advocacy and research. AAFA provides practical information, community based services and a network of support through regional chapters and partners throughout the United States. www.aafa.org

 

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and Sierra Club Green Home (SCGH) - Helping Consumers Find Greener Products and Services

August 24th 2011

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and Sierra Club Green Home (SCGH) are collaborating to help consumers find greener, healthier product and service providers by co-promoting the SCGH GreenCheck program.

“GreenCheck is not a certification program, but aims to help consumers identify businesses and products that are healthier and more sustainable by requesting some very fundamental information about how those providers do business,” said Allen Rathey, President of HHI.

“The GreenCheck process enables us at Sierra Club Green Home to ask providers and retailers about their green credentials, and also taps feedback from end-users to determine ongoing qualification for the GreenCheck recognition,” said Jennifer Schwab, CEO of SCGH.

The SCGH GreenCheck program vets providers in at least 8 major areas:

1. Indoor air quality impact
2. Energy usage
3. Water usage
4. Material usage
5. Waste
6. Customer education
7. Health
8. Business practices

HHI will promote the program on its website and through joint press.  On the HHI site, a Green Directory search box will enable consumers to search for providers in their geographic area as well as online.

“We are pleased to support this program associated with the Sierra Club brand, and hope this national outreach will embrace all providers making sincere efforts to become greener and healthier,” said Rathey. “It’s a way for companies to be recognized for their endeavors to advance health and sustainability in their operations, and a way for consumers to connect with them through the SCGH and HHI websites.”

For more information about GreenCheck, visit http://www.sierraclubgreenhome.com/scgh-greencheck.

 

 

HVI Becomes ANSI-Accredited

June 22nd 2011

 

The Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) was awarded the distinction of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Accreditation this spring for its Certification Program for Ventilating Fan Products.

"This is an important recognition of our industry leading certification program," said Jim Boldt, HVI Chairman. HVI continues to be the preferred and preeminent residential ventilation certification program for ENERGY STAR and federal and state building codes. Consumers, inspectors, architects and builders can be assured that the HVI-Certified products will perform per the certified ratings.

According to their website, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) provides accreditation in accordance with ISO/IEC Guide 65 for product certification programs to ensure that the marketplace can gain confidence for their activities. The program is overseen by the ANSI Product Certification Accreditation Committee (ACC), established by the ANSI Board of Directors. The responsibilities of the committee include approving the key policy documents, reviewing the process of evaluation, accreditation decisions, and monitoring/auditing programs.

The Home Ventilating Institute (HVI), founded in 1955, is a nonprofit association of the manufacturers of home ventilating products. Through its Certified Ratings Program, HVI provides a voluntary means for residential ventilation manufacturers to report comparable and creditable product performance information based upon uniformly applied testing standards and procedures performed by independent laboratories. Certified performance ratings include airflow, sound and energy.

Today, HVI represents manufacturers from the United States, Canada, Asia and Europe, producing the majority of the residential ventilation products sold in North America. HVI certification is a prerequisite for obtaining the ENERGY STAR rating for mechanical ventilation equipment. For more information, contact HVI at 1000 N. Rand Road, Suite 214, Wauconda, IL, USA 60084. Telephone: 847-416-7257; fax: 480-559-9722; E-mail: media@hvi.org. Visit the website at www.hvi.org.

For media inquiries contact:

Kim Collins
HVI Public Relations Specialist
1000 N. Rand Rd.
Suite 214
Wauconda, IL  60084
kcollins@tso.net
P: 847-416-7257

 

 

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) Release 2011 QuickGuide to Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

April 27th 2011

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) have announced the release of the 2011 QuickGuide to Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) - a concise mini-guide with checklists to help consumers identify simple steps to make their indoor air healthier.  The full QuickGuide text is included below and the formatted full-color version can be downloaded as a PDF, and printed for reference.

DOWNLOAD THE QUICKGUIDE TO IAQ

QuickGuide to Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

Though invisible, air is the most basic, life-sustaining feature of your home. Preventive measures, ventilation, and daily habits play a role in protecting your home’s precious supply.

Threats to the Breathing Space (or 'Things to Worry About')

Dirt and Dust: Outdoor soil can contain fertilizer, pesticides and more. Tracked in, it becomes part of the indoor dust, which already holds dander, dust mites, plastics, possibly lead or asbestos from indoor sources, etc. As dust becomes airborne, these substances may enter the body and cause symptoms ranging from asthma and allergy flare-ups to even nervous system damage and cancer.

Mold: Airborne mold spores and mold fragments can trigger asthma and allergy episodes.

VOCs: Volatile organic compounds are found in cleaning liquids, paints, solvents and many more household supplies. They volatize or “off gas” into the air. Not all are harmful, but at high levels, many can cause a range of symptoms from short-term irritation to more ominous organ damage and cancer. The impact of lower levels and of mixtures of VOCs is under discussion or unknown, but reducing exposure is generally a good policy.

Formaldehyde: This VOC is used in a wide variety of household products. Manufacturers have scaled back — but in many cases not eliminated — its use. It is a known carcinogen and may also trigger asthma attacks and irritate the eyes and respiratory system. Off gassing can continue for years, decreasing over time.

Asbestos: Found in some insulation, fireproofing materials, acoustic tile and “popcorn” ceilings, these tiny particles can cause lung-tissue damage and cancer. Asbestos containing materials are harmless as long as they stay intact, but disintegration frees the fibers to enter the airspace and the lungs.

Lead: Damaging to the nervous system, lead can enter the air as dust. Blood lead levels have dropped dramatically since the 1980s, indicating that unleaded gasoline and strategies regarding lead paint and lead pipes are working. Continued vigilance in the home is recommended, especially if your home is older.

Moisture: Water leaks and high relative humidity encourage mold growth, dust mite proliferation and increased formaldehyde emissions from building materials, furnishings and other household items. These irritants can trigger allergy and asthma symptoms.

Carbon Monoxide: Fuel-burning appliances and idling cars in attached garages can release carbon monoxide into the home, causing about 500 preventable deaths each year. The gas causes thousands more to become ill.

Radon: Radioactive gas can cause lung cancer — no smoking necessary. The EPA estimates radon causes 21,000 preventable deaths each year. Radon testing is quite inexpensive and almost effort-free.

Three Action Principles (or 'The General Idea')

Eliminate

Often, the most reliable method of protecting yourself from unhealthy exposures in the home is simply to make sure harmful materials and contaminants are not present. Building or furnishing carefully with less hazardous materials, as well as proper cleaning eliminates many health threats.

Separate or Isolate

When removal is not advisable or not possible, reduce exposure by creating a sealed barrier. For example, tight wall construction keeps potentially hazardous insulation particles out of the living space.

Ventilate

Reduce remaining air contaminants by regularly letting stale air out and fresh air in. Balancing in and out airflows in this process provides fresh air for your family and prevents a vacuum from forming and drawing air from a dangerous source like the furnace exhaust.

Action Plan (or 'How to Stop Worrying & Love Your Home')

Regular Habits    

•    Use a central vacuum that exhausts outside, or a well-filtered (e.g., sealed HEPA) portable vacuum.
•    Dust using tools that don’t flip dust into the air.
•    Declutter to remove dust harbors.
•    Sweep entry walks and keep large mats at doors.
•    Remove shoes when coming in from outside.
•    Keep relative humidity at 30% to 50%.
•    Reduce spray and aerosol cleaner use.
•    Use low-VOC cleaning solutions and products.
•    Run exhaust fans while cooking and showering. Open a window slightly if necessary to keep air pressure balanced.
•    Air out bedding daily to release body moistures before making bed; launder weekly in hot water.
•    Continuously use ventilation systems to provide healthful air in the home.

Annual Protections

•    Replace batteries in carbon monoxide alarm(s).
•    Clean and/or inspect furnace ducts and A/C unit.
•    Sweep chimney.
•    Inspect roof and repair as needed.
•    Winterize outdoor faucets.

As Needed

•    Test for radon at least once and as house settles.
•    Fix window leaks — caulking, weather stripping, etc.
•    Check for and repair plumbing leaks.
•    Monthly to quarterly, replace central A/C and ventilator filters with MERV 10 or 11, or the highest-efficiency filtration your units can handle (see manuals).

New Construction & Special Projects

•    Install hard floors or remove old (dust-filled) carpet and replace with low-pile, low-VOC carpeting.
•    Use low- or no-formaldehyde alternatives to traditional particleboard and plywood building materials and furnishings. Substitutes include solid wood or outdoor grade plywood.
•    Apply moisture barriers during flooring foundation and wall construction.
•    Install a whole-house, continuous ventilation system.
•    Build in radiant rather than forced air heat.
•    Create or renew a 5% to 6% grade of soil sloping away from the house, for good drainage.

Hire a Certified Pro

Have a professional handle these in-depth tasks:
•    Deep cleaning carpet and upholstery
•    Cleaning chimney
•    Home inspection
•    HVAC inspection
•    Mold abatement
•    Asbestos remediation
•    Radon mitigation
•    Lead abatement

About the Partnership – HHI and HVI

In 2008, The Healthy House Institute (HHI) and the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) formed an educational partnership to help consumers understand the importance and principles of residential ventilation and indoor air quality.

About HHI

The Healthy House Institute™ (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes, covering topics in-depth such as air and water quality, building, remodeling and furnishing, cleaning and housekeeping, health and safety, ventilation, lighting, energy efficiency and more.

The Institute’s goal is to reach a mainstream educated consumer with credible information merging the best of ‘green’ with the best of healthier homes research, indoor environmental data, health and medical science, into a practical, timely, easily digestible but comprehensive message. HHI strives to be a truly authoritative voice that has the ‘ear’ and trust of major media, influentials, and most importantly, the intelligent consumer. For more information, contact HHI at 13998 West Hartford Dr., Boise, ID 83713; Telephone: 208-938-3137; Fax: 208-938-3138. Visit the website at www.healthyhouseinstitute.com.

About HVI

The Home Ventilating Institute (HVI), founded in 1955, is a nonprofit association of the manufacturers of home ventilating products. Through a Certified Ratings Program, HVI provides a voluntary means for residential ventilation manufacturers to report comparable and creditable product performance information based upon uniformly applied testing standards and procedures performed by independent laboratories.

Today, HVI represents manufacturers from the United States, Canada, Asia and Europe, producing the majority of the residential ventilation products sold in North America. For more information, contact HVI at 1000 N. Rand Road, Suite 214, Wauconda, IL 60084. Telephone: 847-416-7257; Fax: 480-559-9722; E-mail: hvi@hvi.org. Visit the website at www.hvi.org.

 

 

White Paper: Victory over VOCs – Energy-Saving Fans and Other Devices Help Keep Indoor Air Fresh

November 19th 2010

 

Indoor air quality has been a growing concern, particularly when it comes to newer, energy-efficient homes. While tight, well-insulated homes save money and are better for the environment, they may also trap unhealthy indoor pollutants inside.

What energy-saving homes do well—keep in heat or air conditioning thereby decreasing energy usage—is what also often causes them to retain high levels of harmful compounds in the home air. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that concentrations of volatile organic compounds can be up to ten times higher indoors than outdoors.

Volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, are carbon-based gases emitted into the air by common household products or furnishings.

“A few of the more obvious sources are solvents, cleaning products, fuels, and cigarette or wood smoke,” says Allen Rathey, president of the Healthy House Institute (HHI). “But flooring, upholstery, fabrics, paints or varnishes, and cabinetry can also emit VOCs.” Less obvious potential sources are everyday products like cosmetics, dry-cleaned clothing, hobby and craft supplies, newspapers, photocopiers or printers, moth balls, and even air fresheners.

These gases in the home can have a negative effect on the health of the occupants. Fatigue, dizziness, headache, nausea or irritation of nose, eyes, and throat are a few of the more noticeable symptoms of exposure to VOCs. The severity of the health-risk depends on several factors, such as which compounds are emitted (benzene, for example, is a volatile organic compound and a known carcinogen), the concentration levels in the home, and the length of time those living in the home have been exposed.

While steps can be taken to reduce exposure to VOCs, including removing any known sources from the home, given the wide variety of substances having the potential to release these compounds, some exposure is unavoidable. Therefore, it’s vital to ensure the home has adequate, year-round ventilation.

“Good ventilation is critical in order to dilute the concentration of VOCs indoors,” says Jacki Donner, CAE, Executive Director of the non-profit Home Ventilating Institute (HVI). “Mechanical ventilation systems work year-round in any kind of weather to remove the stale air inside the home and bring the fresh air from outside indoors. While older methods often required a trade-off in terms of energy-efficiency and weren’t practical in all weather conditions, modern cost-effective technology including a range of fans and heat or energy recovery ventilation systems are available that preserve energy-efficiency while keeping indoor air fresh in all seasons.”

Exhaust Fans

Exhaust fans with high-efficiency motors remove pollutants and moisture in specific areas of the home such as in bathrooms, showers, kitchens, and workshops and utility areas. These include:  

•             Bathroom Exhaust Fans
•             Kitchen Range Hoods
•             Downdraft Kitchen Exhausters

Whole House Comfort Ventilators

A properly located whole house comfort ventilator draws cooler outside air through screened windows and doors, pulls it up through the house and exhausts it, usually through static vents in the attic. With traditional, high-volume whole-house comfort ventilators, the result is a cooling breeze throughout the house. In the evening, the fan provides relief from the day’s heat by flushing the house with cool night air as the outdoor temperature drops.

Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRVs) and Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs)

For whole house ventilation, Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRVs) and Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs) bring in outdoor air, circulate it through the home, and expel stale air to the outside while preserving energy. The heat from the exhaust air is retained by the unit’s core, or heat exchanger, and used to warm the air coming in from the outside. In the summer, the process works in reverse, using the cooled exhaust air to remove heat from the air outside. An ERV has the added capability to modulate the moisture, or humidity, that is retained or lost and may be a good choice to minimize the load on cooling systems.

Help for Consumers

Fans for a variety of home applications are readily available from many manufacturers, as are HRVs and ERVs. To ensure that your equipment will perform as advertised, look for systems that have been certified by the Home Ventilating Institute. HVI Certification means that the unit has been tested by a third-party laboratory and meets specific industry standards. Performance data is available for HVI Certified fans as well as HVI Certified HRVs and ERVs.

The Healthy House Institute and the Home Ventilating Institute have produced a helpful Question & Answer e-book that provides information on how home ventilation affects indoor air quality, as well as consumer resources available through HVI. The e-book may be accessed, free of charge, at http://www.jantrain.com/resources/Home_Ventilating_Institute_Question_and_Answer_Book/engage.html.

About HHI

The Healthy House Institute® (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes, covering topics in-depth such as air and water quality, building, remodeling and furnishing, cleaning and housekeeping, health and safety, ventilation, lighting, energy efficiency and more.

The Institute’s goal is to reach a mainstream educated consumer with credible information merging the best of ‘green’ with the best of healthier homes research, indoor environmental data, health and medical science, into a practical, timely, easily digestible but comprehensive message. HHI strives to be a truly authoritative voice that has the ‘ear’ and trust of major media, influentials, and most importantly, the intelligent consumer. For more information, contact HHI at 13998 West Hartford Dr., Boise, ID 83713; Telephone: 208/938-3137; Fax: 208/938-3138. Visit the Web site at www.healthyhouseinstitute.com.

About HVI

Founded in 1955, the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) represents a wide range of home ventilating products manufactured by companies in the United States, Canada, Asia, and Europe, producing the majority of the residential ventilation products sold in North America.

HVI’s Certified Ratings Program provides the means for uniform and unbiased comparison of product performance including airflow, sound and energy usage. HVI Certification has been accepted and recognized as the method of performance assurance by many agencies, including Energy Star, ASHRAE Standard 62.2, U.S. Green Building Council LEED for Homes Program, U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), and the American Lung Association (ALA) Health House Program, among others.

For more information, contact HVI at 1000 N. Rand Road, Suite 214, Wauconda, IL 60084. Telephone: 847/416-7257; fax: 480/559-9722; E-mail: hvi@hvi.org. Visit the Web site at www.hvi.org.

 

 

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) Partners with the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA)

December 18th 2009

 

Boise, Idaho - In an ongoing effort to improve home health, The Healthy House Institute (HHI) announces its partnership with the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA). As part of the relationship, HHI visitors will be able to access environmental health research made available by NEHA.

“Many homes new and old have unseen contaminants that can negatively affect the health of a home,” said Nelson E. Fabian, Executive Director and CEO of NEHA. “By making experts and research available through HHI, homeowners will be empowered with the resources needed to help ensure their families are not adversely impacted by poor building, home care and maintenance practices.”

As a part of the partnership, Fabian will also serve on HHI’s advisory board and provide ongoing direction on HHI’s content and resources. As the Executive Director of NEHA for more than 25 years, Fabian has achieved numerous accolades. In 2007, he was honored as  “One of the Nation’s Top 15 Leaders in Environmental Health” from the Journal of Environmental Health. He is the recipient of several awards including the prestigious Walter Snyder Award given by the National Science Foundation. In addition, he has been asked to serve on a wide variety of different boards.

Under Fabian’s direction, extensive research has been conducted which will be added to the library of articles available at www.healthyhouseinstitute.com. Visitors will be able to  search by category to find potential home hazards and actual studies from NEHA that highlight housing health impacts.

“Asthma, cancer and a variety of other health conditions can result from contaminants in the home,” added Fabian. “Homes are an ecosystem. As a result, every component of that system including HVAC, pest control, cleaning, water treatment, and more, must be carefully reviewed to keep families safe and healthy. Understanding these relationships is an important step in the direction of fostering a healthy housing environment, and we are pleased to be working with The Healthy House Institute to make this information available to the public."

About The Healthy House Institute

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes. HHI treats the home like an ecosystem with many interrelated parts, covering topics in-depth such as air and water quality, building, remodeling and furnishing, cleaning and housekeeping, health and safety, ventilation, lighting, energy efficiency and more. Rather than preaching to the converted, HHI seeks to reach a mainstream educated consumer with credible information merging the best of ‘green’ with the best of healthier homes research, indoor environmental data, health and medical science, into a practical, timely, easily digestible but comprehensive message. HHI strives to be a truly authoritative voice that has the ‘ear’ and trust of major media, influentials, and most importantly, the intelligent consumer.

About NEHA

NEHA is a non-profit association for environmental health professionals. Since 1937, NEHA has been working to advance the environmental health profession for the purpose of improving the human environment in cities, towns, and rural areas throughout the world and creating a more healthful quality of life for all. NEHA’s 4,500+ members practice their profession in the public and private sectors as well as in academia and the uniformed services, with a majority being employed by state and local health departments. In partnership with the National Center for Healthy Housing, NEHA offers the Healthy Homes Specialist Credential. This credential tests an individual’s understanding of the connection between health and housing, enabling a holistic approach to identify and resolve problems that threaten the health and well being of residents. For more information about the National Environmental Health Association, please visit www.neha.org.

 

 

Gaining Victory Over VOCs (and Energy Costs) in Tight Winter Homes - Leading Consumer Organizations Say Use Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRVs)

April 29th 2009

 

BOISE ID. Americans tend to button up their houses during winter to save energy and stay warm. This can create indoor air quality problems, including elevated levels of harmful VOCs. Opening up the windows to air the place out and inserting fans may help, but at the expense of the loss of precious - and expensive - heat energy. What can consumers do?

According to the US EPA: “Ventilation systems can be equipped with a heat exchanger that recovers most of the heating and cooling energy from the exhaust air. These are also known as Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRVs) or Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs).”

“It’s the best of both worlds,” said Jacki Golike, CAE, Executive Director of the non-profit Home Ventilating Institute (HVI). “You can have fresh air without losing heat or running up your heating costs.”

Given the timeliness and importance of this information, The Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) and The Healthy House Institute (HHI) - an educational resource whose mission is to help consumers make their homes healthier -  have formed an educational partnership to teach the principles of residential ventilation and a practical awareness of Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) and Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) technology options. Information on and benefits of using mechanical ventilation systems are featured on the Web sites of both organizations. Visit: www.healthyhouseinstitute.com or HHI on Ventilation or visit www.hvi.org or Ventilation Info for Consumers.  In addition, HVI offers a free brochure covering Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRVs) and Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs).  Also, HVI and HHI have partnered to produce a free QuickGuide to Indoor Air Quality as a general indoor air quality resource.

Benefits of Heat Recovery Ventilation

According to the US EPA, balanced ventilation systems can provide many benefits including:

  • Improved indoor air quality.  Balanced ventilation systems supply fresh air to the living and sleeping areas of homes while exhausting stale air at an equal rate from other areas. This proactive approach to ventilation can result in improved indoor air quality.
  • Improved comfort. ENERGY STAR labeled homes with tight construction and balanced ventilation systems can have fewer drafts and a constant supply of outdoor air resulting in improved comfort.
  • Improved health. Stale air can cause health problems. It can be responsible for symptoms such as headaches, drowsiness, and respiratory problems. These symptoms are more common in homes with poor ventilation and moisture control. Continuously providing fresh air can result in the improved health and well being of the occupants.
  • Lower utility bills. Less energy is consumed to operate ventilation systems than to heat and cool excessive amounts of outdoor air that infiltrates leaky homes. Additional savings are captured when these units are equipped with an energy recovery system or heat exchanger. This can result in lower utility bills, making homes less expensive to operate.
  • Improved resale position. ENERGY STAR labeled homes with balanced ventilation systems can provide the many impressive benefits listed including more comfortable homes with better indoor air quality and lower utility bills. These benefits can translate into higher resale value.

Backstory on VOCs

Volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, are common indoor air pollutants.  VOCs can originate from a variety of natural and man-made sources. The characteristic odor of mold is composed of VOCs, as is the smell of an orange or an onion. Baking bread also releases VOCs into the air. VOCs are also released, or outgassed, from many manufactured products and home furnishings. Familiar sounding VOCs might include benzene, xylene, toluene, formaldehyde, and ethanol. These can all be released from typical building materials.  Indoor air typically contains 30-100 different VOCs that are readily measurable, and others at low levels that are more difficult to measure. Some VOCs cause no health problems, but others are serious indoor air pollutants. Mixtures of VOCs have undetermined health impacts.
 
About HVI

The Home Ventilating Institute (HVI), founded in 1955, is a nonprofit association of the manufacturers of home ventilating products. Through a Certified Ratings Program, HVI provides a voluntary means for residential ventilation manufacturers to report comparable and creditable product performance information based upon uniformly applied testing standards and procedures performed by independent laboratories.

Today, HVI represents manufacturers from the United States, Canada, Asia and Europe, producing the majority of the residential ventilation products sold in North America. For more information, contact HVI at 1000 N. Rand Road, Suite 214, Wauconda, IL 60084. Telephone: 847/526-2010; fax: 847/526-3993; E-mail: hvi@hvi.org. Visit the Web site at www.hvi.org.

About HHI

The Healthy House Institute™ (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes, covering topics in-depth such as air and water quality, building, remodeling and furnishing, cleaning and housekeeping, health and safety, ventilation, lighting, energy efficiency and more.

The Institute’s goal is to reach a mainstream educated consumer with credible information merging the best of ‘green’ with the best of healthier homes research, indoor environmental data, health and medical science, into a practical, timely, easily digestible but comprehensive message. HHI strives to be a truly authoritative voice that has the ‘ear’ and trust of major media, influentials, and most importantly, the intelligent consumer. For more information, contact HHI at 13998 West Hartford Dr., Boise, ID 83713; Telephone: 208/938-3137; Fax: 208/938-3138. Visit the Web site at www.healthyhouseinstitute.com.

 

 

Public Relations

Sweeney Public RelationsSweeney Public Relations is the agency of record for The Healthy House Institute®.

 

For media interviews, please contact Jim Sweeney at 440-333-0001 or Rachel Kaylor at 910-772-1688.

Media Bios

Many of the HHI Advisory Board members listed below are available for media interviews. Please fill out the form below, and select the expert(s) you're interested in interviewing.

Name:
E-Mail:

Field Advisors

Dave BrueggemannDave Brueggemann - CEO, SolarCascade.
Mark (Ron) L. HixsonMark (Ron) L. Hixson - President, Earthcraft Construction, Inc.
Shel HorowitzShel Horowitz - Ethical/Green Marketing Expert, Green and Profitable.
Shon ParksShon Parks - Owner/Principal, Land WEST Studio.
Paul TierneyPaul Tierney - Principal, Environmental Services and Consulting, LLC.

Green & Healthy Living

Jim BoldtJim Boldt - Immediate Past Chairman of the Board, Home Ventilating Institute (HVI); Group Vice President of Engineering, Broan-NuTone, LLC.
Annie B. BondAnnie B. Bond - Executive Producer, Care2.com's Green Living Channels; Author, Better Basics for the Home.
Rosalind  Creasy Rosalind Creasy - Author, Edible Landscaping.
John C. Fox P.E.John C. Fox P.E. - Chairman of the Board, Home Ventilating Institute (HVI); CEO, Air King Ventilation.
Jennifer Schwab LEED APJennifer Schwab LEED AP - Director of Sustainability, Sierra Club Green Home.
Alice ShabecoffAlice Shabecoff - Former Executive Director, National Consumers League.
Heidi WilcoxHeidi Wilcox - Field Specialist, Toxics Use Reduction Institute (TURI) UMass Lowell.
Jerry Yudelson PE, MS, MBA, LEED APJerry Yudelson PE, MS, MBA, LEED AP - Principal, Yudelson Associates.

Health & Medical

Dr. William E. Berger MD, MBADr. William E. Berger MD, MBA - Board Certified in Pediatrics and Allergy and Immunology, Clinical Professor, University of California, Irvine, et al.
Lisa A. Gilmore MBA, MSWLisa A. Gilmore MBA, MSW - Asthma Control Education Expert; Technical Advisor, FHI 360.
Dr. Beti Jackson Psy.D, HSPPDr. Beti Jackson Psy.D, HSPP - Director, PreK2PhD.
Dr. Christina Peterson MDDr. Christina Peterson MD - Neurologist; Medical Director, Oregon Headache Clinic.
Dr. John J. Ratey M.D.Dr. John J. Ratey M.D. - Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School.
Dr. Neil Schachter MDDr. Neil Schachter MD - Professor of Medicine and Community Medicine, and Medical Director of the Respiratory Care Department, Mount Sinai Medical Center.
Dr. Philip Tierno, Jr.Dr. Philip Tierno, Jr. - Director of Clinical Microbiology and Diagnostic Immunology, Tisch Hospital, New York University Medical Center; Associate Professor, Departments of Microbiology and Pathology, New York University Medical Center.

Health Science

Scott Armour MSScott Armour MS - Owner, Armour Applied Science.
Dr. Charlene BayerDr. Charlene Bayer - Director, Georgia Institute of Technology's Indoor Environment Research Program.
Dr. Anila Bello ScDDr. Anila Bello ScD - Postdoctoral Fellow, Exposure, Epidemiology, and Risk Program, Harvard School of Public Health.
Holly Brown-WilliamsHolly Brown-Williams - Director of Policy, Health Research for Action, UC Berkeley School of Public Health.
Martin Chapman Ph.D.Martin Chapman Ph.D. - President, INDOOR Biotechnologies; Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia.
Dr. Gene Cole Ph.D.Dr. Gene Cole Ph.D. - Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Brigham Young University.
Dr. Jules ElkinsDr. Jules Elkins - Department of Geography and the Environment, University of Texas at Austin.
Dr. Andrea Ferro Ph.D.Dr. Andrea Ferro Ph.D. - Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University.
Charles P. Gerba Ph.D.Charles P. Gerba Ph.D. - Professor of Environmental Microbiology, University of Arizona.
Elizabeth B. Goldsmith Ph.D.Elizabeth B. Goldsmith Ph.D. - Professor in the College of Human Sciences, Florida State University.
Dr. Nancy GoodyearDr. Nancy Goodyear - Assistant Professor, Depart of Clinical Laboratory & Nutritional Sciences, UMass Lowell.
Devra Lee Davis Ph.D. MPHDevra Lee Davis Ph.D. MPH - Director, Center for Oncology at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute; Professor of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health; Visiting Professor, Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz School of Public Policy & Management.
Jason Marshall Sc.D.Jason Marshall Sc.D. - Director, UMass Toxics Use Reduction Institute (TURI) Surface Solutions Laboratory.
Jeffrey  C. MayJeffrey C. May - M.A., CIAQP (Certified Indoor Air Quality Professional) and Principal Scientist, May Indoor Air Investigations.
David Mudarri Ph.D.David Mudarri Ph.D. - EPA Senior Analyst, Indoor Environments Division (retired), United States Environmental Protection Agency.
Robert W. Powitz Ph.D., M.P.H, R.S., D.L.A.A.S.Robert W. Powitz Ph.D., M.P.H, R.S., D.L.A.A.S. - Forensic Sanitarian, R.W. Powitz & Associates.
Dr. Margaret M. Quinn ScD, CIHDr. Margaret M. Quinn ScD, CIH - Director, Department of Work Environment and Director of the Sustainable Hospitals Program in the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.
Richard J. Shaughnessy Ph.D.Richard J. Shaughnessy Ph.D. - Program Director of IAQ Research, University of Tulsa.
Anne C. Steinemann Ph.D.Anne C. Steinemann Ph.D. - Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Professor of Public Affairs, University of Washington.
Benjamin D. Tanner Ph.D.Benjamin D. Tanner Ph.D. - Microbiologist, Antimicrobial Test Laboratories.
Ellen R. TohnEllen R. Tohn - Founder & Principal, Tohn Environmental Strategies.
Charles D. (Chuck) Treser MPH, DAASCharles D. (Chuck) Treser MPH, DAAS - Senior Lecturer, Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington.
Robert A. WoellnerRobert A. Woellner - President and Senior Scientist, Quality Environmental Services & Technologies, Inc.

Home and Building Science

Scott Armour MSScott Armour MS - Owner, Armour Applied Science.
Robert Bean R.E.T.Robert Bean R.E.T. - Editor and Moderator, Healthy Heating.
Dan Chiras PhDDan Chiras PhD - Founder and Director, The Evergreen Institute.
Dr. Graham CliffDr. Graham Cliff - Nanotechnologist in Materials Science.
Ian Cull P.E.Ian Cull P.E. - President, Indoor Science.
Brion GrantBrion Grant - President, The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI).
Jay Hall Ph.D.Jay Hall Ph.D. - President, Jay Hall and Associates, Inc.
Rebecca L. MorleyRebecca L. Morley - Executive Director, National Center for Healthy Housing.
Dr. Steven SpivakDr. Steven Spivak - Science Advisory Council Chair, Cleaning Industry Research Institute (CIRI); Technical Advisor, Restoration Industry Association (RIA); Professor Emeritus, Fire Protection Engineering, The University of Maryland.
Bill WeigandBill Weigand - Instructor, Restoration Sciences Academy (RSA).
Dr. Mariel Wolfson PhDDr. Mariel Wolfson PhD - Collaborator, Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies.

Home Building & Remodeling

Everett CollierEverett Collier - Chairman of the Board & Former President, National Association of the Remodeling Industry.
Carl SevilleCarl Seville - Owner, Seville Consulting.
Carol VenoliaCarol Venolia - Architect & Educator, EcoDwelling program at New College of California.
David F. WilsonDavid F. Wilson - Past President, National Association of Home Builders.

Home Energy

Dave BrueggemannDave Brueggemann - CEO, SolarCascade.
Dennis CreechDennis Creech - Executive Director, Southface Energy Institute.
Jim GunshinanJim Gunshinan - Editor, Home Energy Magazine.

Home Safety

Jack McGrawJack McGraw - National Director, The ASHI School.
Debra Smiley Holtzman J.D., M.A.Debra Smiley Holtzman J.D., M.A. - Child Safety Advocate, TheSafetyExpert.com.
Donna Stein-HarrisDonna Stein-Harris - Executive Director, Home and Community Partnerships and Initiatives, National Safety Council.

Legal

Stephen M. NipperStephen M. Nipper - Partner, Buchanan Nipper LLC.

Non-Profits

Rochelle DavisRochelle Davis - Founding Executive Director, Healthy Schools Campaign.
Robert Donofrio Ph.D.Robert Donofrio Ph.D. - Director, Microbiology Lab, NSF International.
Nelson E. FabianNelson E. Fabian - Executive Director and CEO, National Environmental Health Association (NEHA).
Aileen Gagney MArch, MFA, GA-C, HHSAileen Gagney MArch, MFA, GA-C, HHS - Director, American Lung Association's Master Home Environmentalist Program.
Arthur B, Weissman Ph.D.Arthur B, Weissman Ph.D. - President & CEO, Green Seal Inc.

Press - Consumer Media

Robyn Griggs LawrenceRobyn Griggs Lawrence - Editor-in-Chief, Organic Spa Magazine.
Shel HorowitzShel Horowitz - Ethical/Green Marketing Expert, Green and Profitable.
Simran SethiSimran Sethi - Co-host, Writer, Sundance Channel's The Green.
Philip ShabecoffPhilip Shabecoff - Founder, Greenwire.
Fran SorinFran Sorin - Principal, Fran Sorin Garden Designs, LLC.
Olivia ZaleskiOlivia Zaleski - Host, CNN's The Business of Green.

Sustainability

Scot CaseScot Case - Director, Markets Development, UL Environment, Inc.
Christi GrahamChristi Graham - Founder & Executive Producer, West Coast Green.
Tang G. LeeTang G. Lee - Professor of Architecture, Building Science and Indoor Environmental Quality, The University of Calgary.
Dr. Stanley Rhodes Ph.D.Dr. Stanley Rhodes Ph.D. - President and CEO, Scientific Certification Systems.

TV - Consumer Media

Kevin ContrerasKevin Contreras - Executive Producer and Host, Building Green TV.
Scott MorganScott Morgan - Former Host, HGTV's Dream Builders Series.

Universal Design

Konrad KaletschKonrad Kaletsch - Founder, Universal Design Resource.